Información para la
Vigilancia y Control
del Cáncer
Recursos y formación
RCG Noticia

Declining Cancer Death Rates
30/06/2011
Declining Cancer Death Rates
Cancer death rates in the United States are continuing to decline, resulting in almost 900,000 fewer deaths over a 17 year period, yet that figure varies greatly among education levels, a marker of socioeconomic status, according to the annual new statistics published last week.
 
Cancer death rates in the United States are continuing to decline, resulting in almost 900,000 fewer deaths over a 17 year period, yet that figure varies greatly among education levels, a marker of socioeconomic status, according to the annual new statistics published last week.

The report, "Cancer Statistics, 2011," published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians, estimates the United States will have 1,596,670 new cancer cases and 571,950 cancer deaths in 2011. Statistics are based on government data. Currently, one in 4 people in the United States dies from cancer; it is the second leading cause of death, following heart disease.

Overall, death rate decreased by almost 2 percent per year from 2001 through 2007 among men and by slightly less (1.5 percent) among females from 2002 through 2007. Incidence among both men and women slightly also decreased each year of the latest study period.

The report concluded that eliminating educational and racial disparities could potentially have avoided about 37 percent (60,370) of the premature cancer deaths among individuals aged 25 to 64 years in 2007 alone.

Leading Sites of New Cancer Cases and Deaths—2011 Estimates

Report highlights include:

* The three most commonly diagnosed types of cancer among women in 2011 will be breast, lung and bronchus, and colorectum, accounting for about 53 percent of estimated cancer cases.
* Breast cancer alone is expected to account for 30 percent of all new cancer cases among women.
* Among men, cancers of the prostate, lung and bronchus, and colorectum will account for about 52 percent of all newly diagnosed cancers; prostate cancer will account for 29 percent of the cases.
* For all cancers, African American men have a 14 percent higher incidence rate and a 33 percent higher death rate than white men; African American women have a 6 percent lower incidence rate but a 17 percent higher death rate than white women.
* In 2007, cancer death rates in the least educated segment of the population were 2.6 times higher than those in the most educated segment.

Source: Rebecca Siegel, Elizabeth Ward, Otis Brawley, and Ahmedin Jemal. "Cancer statistics, 2011." CA Cancer J Clin. June 2011.
Enlaces relacionados:
 
Tags: cáncerdecliningrates
 
Permalink: http://cancergranada.com/?iid=declining_cancer_death_rates&itid=4&lan=es
 
© Desarrollado por Web4bio